More rare Stephen Boyd Pics from Shutterstock, Part 2 – Mariella di Sarzana & Martha Millar

Actor Stephen Boyd And Fiancee Mariella Di Sarzana (now Married) Box 723 408121627 A.jpg.
Mandatory Credit: Photo by ANL/Shutterstock (9044095a) Actor Stephen Boyd And Fiancee Mariella Di Sarzana (now Married) Box 723 408121627 A.jpg. Actor Stephen Boyd And Fiancee Mariella Di Sarzana (now Married) Box 723 408121627 A.jpg.
Actor Stephen Boyd And Wife Mariella Di Sarzana After Their Fulham Registry Office Wedding. Box 723 508121633 A.jpg.
Mandatory Credit: Photo by Ron Stilling/ANL/Shutterstock (9045518a) Actor Stephen Boyd And Wife Mariella Di Sarzana After Their Fulham Registry Office Wedding. Box 723 508121633 A.jpg. Actor Stephen Boyd And Wife Mariella Di Sarzana After Their Fulham Registry Office Wedding. Box 723 508121633 A.jpg.
Actor Stephen Boyd And Wife Mariella Di Sarzana After Their Wedding At Fulham Registry Office. Box 723 408121647 A.jpg.
Mandatory Credit: Photo by ANL/Shutterstock (9045556a) Actor Stephen Boyd And Wife Mariella Di Sarzana After Their Wedding At Fulham Registry Office. Box 723 408121647 A.jpg. Actor Stephen Boyd And Wife Mariella Di Sarzana After Their Wedding At Fulham Registry Office. Box 723 408121647 A.jpg.
Actor Stephen Boyd And Wife Mariella Di Sarzana After Their Wedding At Fulham Registry Office. Box 723 408121648 A.jpg.
Mandatory Credit: Photo by ANL/Shutterstock (9044169a) Actor Stephen Boyd And Wife Mariella Di Sarzana After Their Wedding At Fulham Registry Office. Box 723 408121648 A.jpg. Actor Stephen Boyd And Wife Mariella Di Sarzana After Their Wedding At Fulham Registry Office. Box 723 408121648 A.jpg.
Mary Millar Mother Of Film Star Stephen Boyd. Box 0580 110615 00283a.jpg.
Mandatory Credit: Photo by ANL/Shutterstock (4855707a) Mary Millar Mother Of Film Star Stephen Boyd. Box 0580 110615 00283a.jpg. Mary Millar Mother Of Film Star Stephen Boyd. Box 0580 110615 00283a.jpg.
Mrs Mary Millar Mother Of Film Stat Stephen Boyd. Box 0580 110615 00284a.jpg.
Mandatory Credit: Photo by ANL/Shutterstock (4855714a) Mrs Mary Millar Mother Of Film Stat Stephen Boyd. Box 0580 110615 00284a.jpg. Mrs Mary Millar Mother Of Film Star Stephen Boyd. Box 0580 110615 00284a.jpg.

Stephen Boyd and Stacy Keach in “The Squeeze”, 1977

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Stephen Boyd’s last feature film, The Squeeze, directed by Michael Apted (Gorky Park, Coal Miner’s Daughter), is a gritty, 70’s British crime drama starring an impressively British-accented Stacy Keach, Edward Fox, and David Hemmings. It’s a stunning cast, and an equally entertaining crime romp through the streets and back by-ways of London. For Stephen, this was one of those rare film opportunities where he could actually use and enhance his native Ulster brogue with great affect. Boyd portrays an Irish gangster, Vic , and his performance is chilling and effective, especially when countered against the more refined (and cautiously nervous) David Hemmings as his partner. Carol White is excellent as the kidnapped woman who frets for her daughter’s safety and uses all her wiles to try to turn her captors favor. She runs into a wall, however, when confronting Vic, and the climax of a heist-gun-kidnap battle on the streets of London-town is riveting. Boyd, at this time in his career, seemed ready to take on the long coveted character parts he had always cherished. It is sad that his untimely end came at a moment when his career could have taken off in a fascinating new direction.

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Carol White confronts Stephen Boyd in The Squeeze, 1977

Many thanks to Emmanuel in France for finding the below interview of Stacy Keach about The Squeeze.

http://www.cinemadelirium.com/2015/08/stacy-keach-talks-to-cinema-delirium.html?m=1

CD: In the late 70s you obviously worked in Italy a little bit and also made a terrific British thriller called THE SQUEEZE [1977].

As Jim Naboth in Michael Apted’s THE SQUEEZE with Freddie Starr

SK: Oh I love that film. Michael Apted.

CD: It’s a film that still hits quite hard even now, nearly 40 years on. Is there a difference between working on a British set with a British crew and working on an American set.

SK: I love the tea breaks [laughs]. No, not really no. When I shot LUTHER, Freddie Young the cameraman, my God I’ll never forget, he was in his late 70s and he came bounding into the studio one morning saying “I’m going to direct my first movie”, he was so excited. He was something else, he never stopped working, he was a genius at lighting, David Lean certainly took advantage of that.

But no, British crews are great. You know I like shooting where we’re not taking breaks every half an hour, which happens in America, I like to just keep moving… keep moving and keep going forward. You know it’s good for the actors too because nothing frustrates an actor more than sitting around and getting ready to go and then being told it’s not time yet because something has to be fixed. What you learn as the years go by is that you never get everything on the first take – something’s going to be off, you just know you’re not going to hit it, but that takes years of experience.

CD: In THE SQUEEZE one of the particular strengths of that film I think is the vivid use of locations and that really gives it a grounding in reality; I imagine those location shoots were quite lively.

SK: Oh they were indeed yes. Gosh yes – you’re bringing it all back in my head. Stephen Boyd. He was so great. It was so tragic though he died so young. He was great to work with. Same with David Hemmings. And Carol White.

CD: It was another film with a superb cast: Edward Fox was also in it. And Freddie Starr of course.

SK: Freddie Starr was great. One day he’d come out and spit on my windshield, I couldn’t believe it, he thought he was being funny. He is good in the film though, he’s very good. And he was fun to work with… most of the time! As a stand-up comedian he was… always on. He was very popular then.

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THE SQUEEZE. Image shot 1977. Exact date unknown.

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Caution vs impulse…Hemmings and Boyd as uneasy crime partners in The Squeeze, 1977

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A couple more excellent blog posts about The Squeeze below, as well as my own little The Squeeze Tribute on YouTube!

https://montages.no/2016/11/flashback-the-squeeze-1977/

http://dustyvideobox.blogspot.com/2013/01/timecapsule-squeeze-1977.html

http://www.criminalelement.com/the-squeeze-michael-apted-british-crime-movie-gangster-stacey-keach-carol-white-scott-adlerberg/

Stephen Boyd Photo from Movie TV Secrets, May 1963

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This I found unexpectedly in a Doris Day article from 1963 covering her divorce. The article relates the story about Stephen and Doris on the set of “Jumbo.”

And last, but not least, is the man who threw the first monkey wrench into Doris’ marriage. That man is Stephen Boyd, the handsome, English actor who co-starred with her in Jumbo. Steve is a dark, brooding, independent kind of guy who says just what he thinks and doesn’t care who knows it. He’s got the ladies drooling in Hollywood as one of the most eligible bachelors, but sexy Steve has quit town to work in Europe (which hasn’t prevented him from constantly wiring flowers to Doris).

They first discovered their mutual attraction while working on Jumbo. The story goes, as related by the producer Joe Pasternak, that they couldn’t stop  a long, passionate kiss during one of the clinch scenes even when the director yelled “Cut!” Everybody was stunned because Doris has an aversion to playing kissy-face in front of the cameras, and usually raises a rumpus when the scene has to be shot over again,. They continued their romance off screen as well, and it became pretty involved before Steve returned to Merry England

The photo is a great shot of Stephen, and it’s actually a promo shot from “Lisa”, 1962.

 

Stephen Boyd and Monica Peterson on the set of The Fall of the Roman Empire, 1964

What a handsome picture of Stephen from the set of The Fall of the Roman Empire! Monica Peterson, seen here, was an extra in the film. She went onto to act in Anthony and Cleopatra in 1972 (starring Charlton Heston). She also spoke about Stephen in the documentary “The Man Who Never Was” about Stephen Boyd from 2011.

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photo from http://www.monicapeterson.com