The shrinkage: In honour of Ant-Man, we rank the best movies about characters who shrink down – Ottawa Citizen

https://ottawacitizen.com/entertainment/movies/the-shrinkage-in-honour-of-ant-man-we-rank-the-best-movies-about-characters-who-shrink-down/wcm/d2235974-22e1-4566-ace3-d13b52d9ffc4

#1!!!

Fantastic Voyage

It’s somewhat surprising that one of the more family-friendly offerings of the shrunken down genre, would be among the most serious. Decades after its 1966 release, Fantastic Voyage has been echoed in films like Innerspace and an unforgettable episode of The Magic School Bus. Nonetheless, it still stands out as the best shrunken-down mission into the human body. With a compelling narrative adventure and a colourful aesthetic composition, Fantastic Voyage is the perfect intersection of science-fiction and anxiety-symbology, making it the all-time shrink-down classic.

Before there were Razzies, there was the Harvard Lampoon Awards!

Today the annual Razzie Awards came out to celebrate the worst performances and movies for the year. These awards started in 1980. The previous association that would issue this type of award was from student humor magazine The Harvard Lampoon, based at Harvard University in Massachusetts. This award humorously began in 1939 and they would annually announce a “Movie Worst Issue” magazine.

The Worst Actress award was called The Natalie Wood Award because Natalie Wood had won this dubious prize for three consecutive years in the early 1960’s. She even went to Harvard to personally accept the award in 1966. What a good sport!

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Natalie Wood at Harvard accepting her Worst Actress Award in 1966

The Worst Actor award was called The Kirk Douglas Award. I can’t seem to find which movie gave Kirk this distinction. Maybe it’s a slew of them!

And yes, for the year of 1966-1967 our Stephen got a special mention for something called “the Roscoe Award”. See below!

(George) Peppard was named for the “Kirk Douglas Award” as the year’s worst actor for his performance in “The Blue Max.”

Miss Andress was chosen for “The Natalie Wood Award” as worst actress for her part in “Casino Royale.”

The 10 worst pictures were ranked behind 1) “Is Paris Burning?” in this order: 2. Hurry Sundown; 3. The Oscar; 4. The Fortune Cookie; 5. The Bible; 6. A Countess from Hong Kong; 7. The Blue Max; 8. Fantastic Voyage; 9. Torn Curtin and 10. Penelope.

Leslie Caron was named the worst supporting actress of the year for “Is Paris Burning” and John Huston the worst supporting actor for “The Bible.”

Stephen Boyd was given the special Roscoe Award, with the notation that “This coveted trophy is awarded annually to the actor or actress who, in the past year, has most memorably displayed that certain unskilled, clumsy quality that has marked the products of Hollywood since the early days.”

It went to Boyd for “his starring roles in The Oscar and Fantastic Voyage and for his brief but significant appearance in The Bible.”

Bennington Banner, May 25, 1967

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Ouch. Sorry Stephen. Frankie Fane would not agree with this assessment and neither do I. But I hope Stephen took this news as well as Natalie Wood did!

In another example of this humorous publication, here is a sample from 1966:

The Piltdown Mandible (presented annually for the lamest example of scientific improbable phenomenon): This year to the producers of Fantastic Voyage for assuming that the molecules which made up the submarine would not re-expand to normal size because said submarine had been devoured by a white corpuscle; and to the lame cow in The Bible who supplied an estimated 974,000 gallons of milk to all the animals on the Ark for 40 days and 40 nights
The Merino Award: To the two merinos on the Ark in The Bible

http://www.uaadb.com/viewtopic.php?t=10032

..and from 1964:

Worst Performance by a Cast in Toto: The entire population of Western Europe for its performance in The Fall of the Roman Empire

Hedda Hopper “Steve Boyd is back from Stint Abroad”, 1964 Interview

Looking at Hollywood, by Hedda Hopper

STEVE BOYD IS BACK FROM STINT ABROAD

Francoise Dorleac and Stephen Boyd in Yugoslavia

Hollywood, Dec 28, 1964 – Steve Boyd, who spent more than half of this year in Europe for “Genghis Khan” and “The Bible,” finally came to a halt at Twentieth Century Fox for “The Fantastic Voyage,” which puts him on the sets Jan.5 for 85 days….

“I was over four months in Yugoslavia with Omar Sharif and Francoise Dorleac, a wonderful experience,” Steve said. “It’s the only country I’ve hit where United States aid is appreciated. All housing build with our money flies American flags atop buildings and the people are cordial and express their gratitude. I reported back here for “Voyage” to learn it was postponed a month, so accepted John Huston’s offer to play Nimrod, which fitted neatly into the interval. Just before I was to leave, Saul David, my producer, said he and Dave Fleischer must have some huddles with me first. So I canceled the flight and  took tickets for a plane four days later. It saved my life. I was booked on Flight 800 which went down with everyone aboard lost. (For more about TWA 800 Crash, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TWA_Flight_800_(1964)  )

“We were rained out when I first hit Cairo,” Steve continued, “Huston was working in the Moadi desert 50 miles outside the city, and I got lost heading for location. Nothing but sand in all directions, not even a mirage in sight. I was done up in a fantastic costume of gold metal eyebrows and helmet, tight black leather pants and fur chaps. A man appeared out of nowhere and thrust his arm inside the car. I thought I’d be shot on sight, instead he shook hands, said something in Egyptian and pointed out the direction of our company.”

Steve is leaner and handsomer these days, work black British woolens and had a close contemporary haircut. When I accused him of being a contender for Cary Grant’s sartorial spot he said: “I’m glad to be rid of that long hair I’ve sported with armor and costume stuff. I play a super-modern man and it’s the first film I’m not allowed to talk about. Generally this is a publicity gimmick, but Life magazine was turned down flat when they asked to photograph sets and see a script, and 35 foreign publications were refused also. After “Voyage” I’ll do a western for Columbia, as yet untitled. Eli Wallach will play the original Gimbel who founded the great merchant fortune and came west in the early days.”

“You sounded close to permanence with that English girl just before you went away,” I said. “What about it?” He grinned. “The little black book book gets obsolete every time I leave, so that romance is dead. As for girls, the minute they start with ‘dear heart’ and ‘darling,’ I run. Women in Yugoslavia are attractive in a big busted way,” he said. “Tito would export bosoms and rocks and make a fortune. They place is full of giant boulders and women build the roads, throwing big rocks into a crushed which a man operates. He reads his newspaper, she throws the boulders into a hopper, and he presses the lever with his foot. Then she picks up the pieces and lays them one by one in the roadbed. These girls are handsome and firm muscled; but the ones with easier jobs are given to fat.”

Steve’s still suing Anthony Mann for half a million over “The Unknown Battle.”  “I missed out on four good roles and plenty of money when he signed me without financial backing and then dropped the project,” Steve said. “He asked me again later but I’d made other commitments, so Kirk Douglas and Richard Harris made it under another title. Westerns are the big money makers in Europe. Clint Eastwood of Rawhide TV made a western in Spain with an Italian director and cast, all of whom took American names for it. It cost $140,000 and has already grossed 2 million dollars, and Clint is the top star in Italy now. ‘Jumbo’ has lines a block long in Spain when I first went over there and it was the same story months later.”

Stephen Boyd gets swarmed by a crowd at a “Jumbo” premiere

Steve says we’re behind on the subject of nutrition in which he’s keenly interested. “I can’t find a good nutritionist in Los Angeles. My mother, who was crippled with arthritis and couldn’t move about at all a year ago, has been under care of a London doctor who has a new cure. When I saw her recently she was walking in the garden without a cane. It’s a combination of exercise and diet, and she’s given a glass of red wine each day.”