Some fantastic costumes worn by Stephen Boyd from Ben-Hur and Jumbo

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https://www.icollector.com/Stephen-Boyd-ivory-ringmaster-jacket-boots-and-hat-designed-by-Morton-Haack-from-Billy-Rose-s-Jumbo_i11436935

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Costumes from the film Ben Hur at the Debbie Reynolds Auction Breaks Up Historic Hollywood Collection (The Paley Center for Media in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, CA, USA). On the foreground: Costume worn by Charlton Heston as Judah Ben-Hur and costume worn by Stephen Boyd as Messala.

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A group of Stephen Boyd costumes from the chariot race in Ben-Hur Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1959. Comprising a black wool tunic with copper-colored braid and button design to shoulders and bottom, with Simmon’s label sewn in; a black tunic, likely lightweight rubber, studio-distressed, with painted copper-colored design; a leather belt with copper-colored eagle and laurel applique; a leather belt with painted copper-colored design; 2 hard rubber helmets with visors; 2 suede-covered laced leather boots with copper-colored appliques in floral design; and a leather armband with copper-colored laurel design. A dramatic costume worn by Stephen Boyd as Messala, the villain in one of the most exciting action scenes in film history. The “distressed” tunic and belt in this lot appear to have been used in the aftermath of Messala’s chariot wreck by a stunt performer or Boyd. Provenance: David Weisz Co., MGM Auction and Tag Sale, 1970. https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/23477/lot/857/?category=list

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Stephen Boyd “Messala” elaborate ceremonial metal armor and leather tunic and short sword from Ben-Hur. (MGM, 1959) Elaborate ceremonial metal breastplate made of steel and brass with grey and red suede skirt adorned with metal decorations. No label. Includes ornate metal-handled short sword (27” including sheath) in pewter-colored metal and wrapped brass sheath, bearing a symbol of a wreath surrounding an eagle clutching two snakes. Sword blade bears marking “CC7”. Worn by Stephen Boyd as “Messala” in the scene where Heston is apprehended by Roman soldiers during the procession in Ben-Hur.

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Stephen Boyd complete “Messala” charioteer costume from the iconic chariot race sequence in Ben-Hur. (MGM, 1959) This stunning ensemble includes the gold leather helmet with eagle motif, long tunic with gold thread detailing with interior bias label marked “Messala S. Boyd #1”, black suede belt with gold eagle and flourishes, with pair of matching gauntlets and black suede boots with gold trim and lion head medallions attached on front. An incredible and iconic costume perfectly preserved with each fitment bearing the character and actor’s name.

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A Stephen Boyd costume design sketch by Elizabeth Haffenden from “Ben Hur” Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1959. Rendered in gouache and pencil on board, drawing depicts the actor as main character, Messala, wearing a ancient-style toga with purple trim and sandals; annotations pencilled on the right-side margin read “Messala / Toga / #3 / Scs. 297/298;” more notes about the costume are written on the verso, and small swatches of fabric are stapled to the right-side margin. Also included is a second costume design sketch depicting actress Haya Harareet who portrayed Esther, wearing a traditional Biblical-era ensemble; pencilled notations and fabric swatches also appear on this sketch. Both are signed by noted costumier, Elizabeth Haffenden. 17 x 13in

Stephen Boyd Photo from Movie TV Secrets, May 1963

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This I found unexpectedly in a Doris Day article from 1963 covering her divorce. The article relates the story about Stephen and Doris on the set of “Jumbo.”

And last, but not least, is the man who threw the first monkey wrench into Doris’ marriage. That man is Stephen Boyd, the handsome, English actor who co-starred with her in Jumbo. Steve is a dark, brooding, independent kind of guy who says just what he thinks and doesn’t care who knows it. He’s got the ladies drooling in Hollywood as one of the most eligible bachelors, but sexy Steve has quit town to work in Europe (which hasn’t prevented him from constantly wiring flowers to Doris).

They first discovered their mutual attraction while working on Jumbo. The story goes, as related by the producer Joe Pasternak, that they couldn’t stop  a long, passionate kiss during one of the clinch scenes even when the director yelled “Cut!” Everybody was stunned because Doris has an aversion to playing kissy-face in front of the cameras, and usually raises a rumpus when the scene has to be shot over again,. They continued their romance off screen as well, and it became pretty involved before Steve returned to Merry England

The photo is a great shot of Stephen, and it’s actually a promo shot from “Lisa”, 1962.

 

Stephen Boyd filming “Jumbo” at MGM Studios 1962 – The Circus Maximus

Below are some nice newspaper ads for “Jumbo” starring Doris Day and Stephen Boyd when the movie was released in December of 1962, and a few funny stories about the filming of the movie in early 1962 at the MGM Culver City Studio. The film was so big that it covered two enormous lots and two large stage sets at MGM!

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“MGM hasn’t seen anything like it since the Circus Maximus – if then. “Billy Rose’s Jumbo” (as they are calling it now) is all over the place…The elephants are housed on Lot 2; so are the horses being trained for Doris Day…The picture is spilling all over the sprawling Culver City studio. The main tent has been erected twice–on Lot 3, about a mile from the studio proper measuring 130×180 ft, and capable of seating 2,000 people, and on Stage 15, MGM’s largest. Here the actual circus acts, some 50 in number, will be shot, and here Miss Day Stephen Boyd and others will perform on trapeze and tightrope.

The big top on Lot 3 is surrounded by a menagerie, a mess tent, a wardrobe tent, wagons, and a sideshow, complete with a merry-go-round. Still another stage, 29, will be utilized for filming the close-up dramatic scenes.

The Los Angeles Times, Feb 7, 1962

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“On the set of MGM’s “Jumbo,” Stephen Boyd, who appears opposite Doris Day as a high-wire specialist and clown, recalled his own humble beginning as a London street busker, or funny man. He remembered that a Bobby watched him try to raise a crowd to earn a few pennies. The policeman sauntered over and said : “After you’re through bein’ funny, mate, you can join the mourners at St. Paul’s.”

The Los Angeles Times, Feb 25, 1962

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Stephen Boyd, co-starring with Doris Day in MGM’s “Jumbo,” discovered, much to his discomfort, that the sequence in which he goes into the cage and subdues a lion was scheduled for the last day of shooting. So Boyd went to the animal’s trainer to ask about the lions culinary habits. “Oh,” the trainer said nonchalantly, “I wouldn’t worry too much about Pete. He’s ferocious looking, but he’s from Italy, and over there he chomped up so many martyrs in those Italian movies that I don’t think he’d go for you.” Boyd retreated as gracefully as possible and was heard muttering: “I played Messala in ‘Ben-Hur’ and I don’t think you could call him a martyr.”

The Los Angeles Times, April 29, 1962

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“Jumbo” has completed filming at MGM, and a variety of amusing incidents during production have been noted here and elsewhere. There was one on the final day when Stephen Boyd was called upon to drive a farm wagon drawn by a spirited horse. After Boyd finished his rehearsals, director Charles Walters commented :”That’s great, Steve, but can you come around that curve a little faster?” The star answered with a question: “Didn’t you see ‘Ben-Hur’?”

The Los Angeles Times, August 26, 1962

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