Feb 12, 1968 : Brigitte Bardot and Stephen Boyd “Shalako” romance rumors hit the headlines of the worldwide gossip columns

50 years ago today!

“Publicists on the Sean Connery-Brigitte Bardot film Shalako described its chemical formula as 007+BB=TNT. But there was a side-effect that sent SB+BB=HEADLINES. An American news agency report from Almeria, Southern Spain, where they were filming, told the world Brigitte had found “a new love interest” in Stephen Boyd.

Both Bardot and Boyd crisply denied the report and then refused to discuss it further. How did the report come about? Was there, despite the denials, any truth in it? These were the sort of questions I set out to answer.

I can now report that I am convinced there was a romance afoot, that Brigitte and Boyd openly displayed their affection for each other, but that publication of the report on their romance cooled it. ” Raymond Palmer from Photoplay in Almeria Spain, 1968.

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https://stephenboydblog.com/stephen-boyd-and-brigitte-bardot/
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February 12, 1968, Des Moines Tribune
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The Central New Jersey Home News, February 12, 1968
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Lansing State Journal, February 12, 1968
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Philadelphia Daily News, Feb 13, 1968
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Feb 13, 1968 Arizona Republic

Boyd Likes Rough and Tumble Roles

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

By Florabel Muir

Boyd Likes Rough and Tumble Roles

Stephen Boyd is one actor who is satisfied to play rough and tough characters rather than romantic leads. “Give me a part with guts in it, and I’ll be happy no matter how big an SOB the character is,” he explains.

The actor gets his wish in spades in the role of “Bosky Fulton,” villainous guide to a group of stranded European aristocrats in “Shalako,” the multi-million dollar western recently shot in Almeria, Spain. The Cinerama release, set in the America Southwest, also stars Brigitte Bardot and Sean Connery, which makes it an odd sort of western.

The fact is, Boyd has played the “bad guy” during the greater part of his career, which means that he usually is playing second fiddle to the “good guy,” the star of the film.

He essayed the role of the charming but deadly Nazi counter espionage agent in “The Man Who Never Was.” Clifton Webb starred. Boyd was prominent in the casts, but not quite starred in , “The Fall of the Roman Empire,” “Genghis Khan,” and “The Bible,” as well as “Island in the Sun,” “The Bravados,” “A Woman Possessed,” and “The Best of Everything.” He did star as the greatest heel of all time in “The Oscar,” a film that didn’t quite reach the expectations of the critics.

Then, of course, there was “Ben Hur.” Boyd’s performance was great. You may also remember, however, that Charlton Heston won the Academy Award for this work in title role.

“Shalako,” a Dimitri de Grunwald production directed by Edward Dmytryk, is Boyd’s first western. The actor, who was born in Ireland but who became an American citizen in 1963, has been eager to do a western since he began in films 15 years ago. “I know it’s strange for an Irishman to want to play in a western, but so I always did.”

The ruggedly built Boyd is delighted with learning the tricks of the cowboy acting profession. For the film he had to learn to ride horses bareback and western style.

He underwent intensive training in how to wield a trusty six-shooter. Gun coach Rod Redwing notes, “Boyd is close to the fastest pupil I’ve ever coached.”

“Shalako” also provides Boyd with the opportunity to practice his Judo and Karate techniques in several sequences. “I studied Judo and Karate several years ago because I know they would come in handy. It’s really why I worked at it. I always know I’d use the training for a part in a western if I ever got to play in one and so I am,” he says with apparent pride.

As for his personal life, Boyd has had a rough- and- tumble difficult life. He had had to push ahead with sheer will power. He had nine older brothers and sisters and that alone was enough to give him determination.

Actually, the wildly gregarious actor is half Irish and half Canadian. Interestingly enough, he was born on July 4, and now that he is am America citizen, he is quite happy about this coincidence.

Boyd, known as a swinging bachelor, had been linked romantically with a number of celebrated beauties. Indeed, the life of one great international star might have been quite different if one film had not been postponed. Because it was, Boyd was required to withdraw from the commitment “due to a conflict in schedules.”

The film was “Cleopatra.” Boyd was originally set to essay the role of Mark Anthony opposite Elizabeth Taylor, but because of her protracted illness the picture was halted for six weeks of shooting. Boyd was forced to exit the film, and was, as you remember, replaced by Richard Burton. The rest is history.

Does Stephen Boyd have any second thoughts? Hardly. “I’m an Irishman. I could hardly get my Irish up over a situation like that.”

Boyd credits Sir Michael Redgrave with his biggest boost as an actor. Steve was a doorman at a theatre in London when he was asked to assist in helping stars onto the stage at the British Film Academy Awards. Sir Michael, who was presenting the awards, noticed the professional bearing and dignity of the young doorman.

Sir Michael says,”It was just intuition. After inquiring about Stephen’s acting background, I merely gave him a letter of introduction to the Windsor Rep. He carried his success from there.”

At one time Boyd was under a long term contract to Twentieth Century Fox which gave him his first ‘starring’ role in “The Man Who Never Was.” Now older and more experienced, Stephen considers actors unwise to sign themselves to companies for long periods. “It’s a bloody bore! You lose all control of your own career and become a ‘Property.’ You can have no free will about the parts you play and this way you run the danger of becoming typed.”

Ten years after he met Brigitte Bardot for the first time, Stephen Boyd and the world’s foremost sex kitten were reunited at the same site where they made their first picture together.

But what a difference a decade made.

When B&B first traded kissed in Almeria, Spain, Steve was just two years into an acting career, barely getting underway, and Miss Bardot, at that time, was already one of the most famous screen females in the world.

The movie filmed in 1957 was called “The Night Heaven Fell.” Almost exactly ten years later, in an Almeria transformed from a sleepy vacation spa on Spain’s southern Costa Del Sol to the most popular movie location site in the world, B&B became a team again- this time in a multi-million dollar western, “Shalako.” The picture, the setting, a lot of things had changed. But some qualities remain always the same. Bardot – and Boyd.

(Copyright, 1968. By News Syndicate Co, INC.)

Did Brigitte Bardot ask Stephen Boyd to marry her?

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I thought that might grab your attention! This didn’t come as complete surprise to me when I came across this Stephen quote which is in a book called “Holy Matrimony! Better Halves and Bitter Halves: Actors, Athletes, Comedians, Directors, Divas, Philosophers, Poets, Politicians and other Celebs Talk About Marriage” by Boze Hadleigh.

Here’s the quote:

“Brigitte Bardot asked me to marry her. I don’t know if she was joking, but I said no. I did not explain that I couldn’t marry an actress who could never be faithful to me. Or at least try. Like I would at least try. for the first year or two. ” – STEPHEN BOYD (Ben-Hur)

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This sounds like something Stephen would say, and from other information I have read and researched about Bardot and Boyd during 1968, their closeness was the real deal. But so was Boyd’s distrust of the marital institution and Bardot’s abysmal lack of fidelity. Still, I like to imagine that Stephen could have possibly been a Mr. Bardot!

To read more about Stephen and Brigitte, see https://stephenboydblog.com/stephen-boyd-and-brigitte-bardot/

 

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Above, photos of Boyd and Bardot at the “Shalako” Munich premiere, October 1968

 

 

During the filming of “Shalako”, Brigitte Bardot and Stephen Boyd enjoy taking pictures–of each other!

In early 1968, Stephen Boyd and Brigitte Bardot were quite enamored with each other during the making of “Shalako”. The pair had become good friends back in 1957 while filming “The Night Heaven Fell”, and had meet at least twice since, once in 1960 in Paris and also in London during 1961. In 1969, a journalist teased Stephen that he never met up with BB between husbands! 

Steve Boyd is one of the nicest leading men in the industry. I’ve never known him to be anything but gentlemanly (darn it!) Recently, I asked him if his romance with Brigutte Bardot was real. “She is a lovely woman, but she is married. I’ve known her for many years, and she has always been married, not to the same man, however.” Steve, how come you play it safe and never meet up with her between marriages, hmmmm? (Detroit Free Press, July 27, 1969)

Nevertheless, now that the two actors were older, somehow the chemistry mix between them was just right. The vulnerable and emotional Bardot, on the brink of another divorce, this time with German millionaire Günther Sachs, was in need of a protective, friendly, warm, gentle shoulder to lean on and Stephen, of course, stepped into that role perfectly. Around the set of Shalako they became virtually inseparable. The photos below show a glimpse of their special personal chemistry and what Shalako producer Euan Lloyd called a “great friendship”.

For more about Brigitte and Stephen, see https://stephenboydblog.com/stephen-boyd-and-brigitte-bardot/

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“Bardot by Boyd….”Boyd by Bardot”

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“I’m No Casanova,” Says Stephen Boyd – to Reassure Mother (1960 Interview)

“I’m No Casanova,” Says Stephen Boyd – to Reassure Mother

Sure, he was introduced to Brigitte Bardot (by her husband) when she was scantily clad, and lost 25 pounds making a film with her. But then, he always loses weight when making a film, even when he’s costarred with a chariot, Irishman says.

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By James Bacon, Associated Press Writer

Courier Journal Nov 13, 1960

LONDON, Nov 12 – Stephen Boyd, the virile Irishman, would like to shake the reputation that is the envy of many another star.

“I really am no Casanova,” says Boyd. “And besides, my mother in Belfast reads all these stories about my so-called love escapades – and it bothers her.

I reminded Boyd that stories linking him with Brigitte Bardot and Hope Lange undoubtedly provided many of the typewriter excesses.

“It’s basically true that I was introduced to Brigitte while he was in a state of dishabille, and that I later lost 25 pounds while making a picture with her.

“But the stories omit that her then husband introduced us, and she quickly threw a towel around herself, and that I lost 25 pounds while making ‘The Big Gamble’ and 20 pounds while making ‘Ben-Hur.’ I always lose weight while working, whether my costar is Miss Bardot or a chariot.”

Boyd said he took Hope Lange to many parties while they were working together on a picture and while she was apparently still happily married to actor Don Murray.

“Hope was separated from Murray, but few people knew it,” says Boyd. “I do not go out with happily  married women – or even unhappily married women whose marriage is still intact. I’m no cad.”

The Lange-Murray separation had long been official.

Boyd now is costarred with Liz Taylor, playing Marc Anthony to her Cleopatra. She has been sick with a mysterious ailment that has delayed production.

 “I always yearned to make Hollywood,” says Boyd, “but as soon as I did, I got sent to Rome for a year for ‘Ben-Hur,’ to France, England, and Africa for six months on ‘The Big Gamble,’ and now another six or eight months in London for ‘Cleopatra.’

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Hope Lange and Stephen Boyd, here shown in a scene from “The Best of Everything,” were linked romantically by some of the Hollywood gossip columnists.