Some fantastic costumes worn by Stephen Boyd from Ben-Hur and Jumbo

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https://www.icollector.com/Stephen-Boyd-ivory-ringmaster-jacket-boots-and-hat-designed-by-Morton-Haack-from-Billy-Rose-s-Jumbo_i11436935

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Costumes from the film Ben Hur at the Debbie Reynolds Auction Breaks Up Historic Hollywood Collection (The Paley Center for Media in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, CA, USA). On the foreground: Costume worn by Charlton Heston as Judah Ben-Hur and costume worn by Stephen Boyd as Messala.

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A group of Stephen Boyd costumes from the chariot race in Ben-Hur Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1959. Comprising a black wool tunic with copper-colored braid and button design to shoulders and bottom, with Simmon’s label sewn in; a black tunic, likely lightweight rubber, studio-distressed, with painted copper-colored design; a leather belt with copper-colored eagle and laurel applique; a leather belt with painted copper-colored design; 2 hard rubber helmets with visors; 2 suede-covered laced leather boots with copper-colored appliques in floral design; and a leather armband with copper-colored laurel design. A dramatic costume worn by Stephen Boyd as Messala, the villain in one of the most exciting action scenes in film history. The “distressed” tunic and belt in this lot appear to have been used in the aftermath of Messala’s chariot wreck by a stunt performer or Boyd. Provenance: David Weisz Co., MGM Auction and Tag Sale, 1970. https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/23477/lot/857/?category=list

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Stephen Boyd “Messala” elaborate ceremonial metal armor and leather tunic and short sword from Ben-Hur. (MGM, 1959) Elaborate ceremonial metal breastplate made of steel and brass with grey and red suede skirt adorned with metal decorations. No label. Includes ornate metal-handled short sword (27” including sheath) in pewter-colored metal and wrapped brass sheath, bearing a symbol of a wreath surrounding an eagle clutching two snakes. Sword blade bears marking “CC7”. Worn by Stephen Boyd as “Messala” in the scene where Heston is apprehended by Roman soldiers during the procession in Ben-Hur.

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Stephen Boyd complete “Messala” charioteer costume from the iconic chariot race sequence in Ben-Hur. (MGM, 1959) This stunning ensemble includes the gold leather helmet with eagle motif, long tunic with gold thread detailing with interior bias label marked “Messala S. Boyd #1”, black suede belt with gold eagle and flourishes, with pair of matching gauntlets and black suede boots with gold trim and lion head medallions attached on front. An incredible and iconic costume perfectly preserved with each fitment bearing the character and actor’s name.

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A Stephen Boyd costume design sketch by Elizabeth Haffenden from “Ben Hur” Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1959. Rendered in gouache and pencil on board, drawing depicts the actor as main character, Messala, wearing a ancient-style toga with purple trim and sandals; annotations pencilled on the right-side margin read “Messala / Toga / #3 / Scs. 297/298;” more notes about the costume are written on the verso, and small swatches of fabric are stapled to the right-side margin. Also included is a second costume design sketch depicting actress Haya Harareet who portrayed Esther, wearing a traditional Biblical-era ensemble; pencilled notations and fabric swatches also appear on this sketch. Both are signed by noted costumier, Elizabeth Haffenden. 17 x 13in

Don’t miss Ben-Hur’s 60th Anniversary return to the Big Screen on April 14 & 17th – A TCM Fathom Event!!!!

This is a truly amazing experience if you have never witnessed Ben-Hur (1959) on the big screen! Don’t miss this major cinematic event!

https://www.fathomevents.com/events/tcm2019-ben-hur-60th-anniversary-1959

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Ben-Hur wardrobe tests for Stephen Boyd and Charlton Heston

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Boyd and Heston on the circus track!

Behind the scenes photo of Charlton Heston & William Wyler
Heston and Wyler in the arena discussing a scene
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Charlton Heston and Jack Hawkins during a Roman Triumphal parade
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Screenwriters Christopher Frye and Gore Vidal
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William Wyler and Haya Harareet at the Golden Globes, 1960

Stephen Boyd (as Messala) talks about that famous chariot race in “Ben-Hur”

Stephen Boyd gives a fun, facetious account of how Messala should have run that famous chariot race!

Stephen Boyd Interview from The Miami News July 10, 1960

The Good Guys Finish Last

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by Art Buchwald

Paris  – The greatest race of the year was in the motion picture “Ben Hur.” The winner of the race was Charlton Heston, who received an Academy Award for it. The loser was Stephen Boyd, who, as Messala, was the favorite until he got knocked out in the seventh round. Mr. Boyd is now in Paris making a filme called “The Big Gamble” for Darryl F. Zanuck. The picture stars Mr. Boyd, David Wayne and Juliette Greco.

When we saw Mr. Boyd on the set he still felt he should have won the race. He believes that if he had won, things would have been a lot different for him now.

“I should have used my spikes sooner,” he said. “It was my fault.”

For those who haven’t seen the picture, the chariot race, which goes on for about fifteen minutes, is its establishing feature. Messala has challenged Ben-Hur and, unbeknownst to Ben-Hur, has fitted a razor-sharp spike to this chariot to cut the spokes of Ben-Hur’s wheel. This, according to the Imperial Chariot Jockey Club, was fair.

“What went wrong?” we asked Mr. Boyd. “Did your trainer give you bad advice?”

“No,” he replied, “I never took orders from anyone. I had won my last seven races and I figured this would be a piece of cake. I bet more money on myself than I had ever bet before. The only thing that bugged me was that Ben-Hur intended to ride a clean race, which is much more dangerous. I should have fixed his chariot before the race, but I was over-confident.”

“It happens a lot with Romans.”

ArticleMovie Stars TV Close Ups July 1960 (1)

“My strategy was perfect,” he said. “I was running second on the first round on the outside, an excellent position. If anyone tried to pass me I could knock him against the Spina, the giant inside wall of the track.

“I wasn’t worried about the other chariots. Most of them were dogs and broken-down pace-setters. But my big mistake was the way I played it when Ben-Hur made his move.”

Mr.  Boyd relives it as if it had only happened yesterday. “I should have gone for his wheel with my blade. Instead, I decided to close in and whip him. I had ripped open the side of his chariot, and instead of concentrating on his axle, I tried to pull his wheel off. It was a great mistake, because I pulled off mine instead.

“But everyone had complained over the fact that I used my whip on Ben-Hur. Why don’t they mention that he used his whip on me? My trainer complained to the stewards after the race was over, but even after viewing the film they gave Ben-Hur the race.”

Mr. Boyd said he had an opportunity to do away with Ben-Hur in the third round, but he became overconfident. “I should have killed when I had the chance. Maybe then I would have gotten the Academy Award.”

Instead Ben-Hur killed Mr. Boyd, this ruling out a chance for a rematch.

“What is your advise to other young charioteers?” we asked.

“If you’ve got a blade on your wheel, use it. If you try to use your whip on the other guy, you don’t have enough control of your horses. Chariot racing is a dirty business and the good guys finish last.”

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